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Mastermind Club

Quiz 2021

No1

General Knowledge

Answers

Set by Mel Kinsey

 

1. Despite having the ability to create fire, stone tools, and adhesives, what species of archaic humans is the basis of the caveman archetype in popular culture? It is named after a valley in Germany where its specimens were first found in 1856. 

Neanderthal

2. Jimmu was the first Emperor of what country?   He was regarded as a descendant of the sun goddess Amaterasu

Japan 

3. On September 4, 1886, who was the last Native American warrior to formally surrender to the United States? His birth name meant ‘the one who yawns’, and he was one of six Native Americans to march in Roosevelt’s 1905 inaugural parade.

Geronimo 

4. Which longest-serving ruler of Egypt died in February 2020? He became a national hero as the Commander of the Egyptian Air Force whose pilots hit 90% of their targets in a surprise attack on Israeli forces during the Yom Kippur War.

Hosni Mubarak

5. Which phrase coined by Archbishop Desmond Tutu was elaborated in a speech by Nelson Mandela during his first month of office, by likening South Africa’s populace to the “jacaranda trees of Pretoria” and the “mimosa trees of the bushveld”?

The Rainbow Nation 

6. Saint Methodius and his brother devised the Glagolitic alphabet to accommodate Slavic languages and evangelise the Slavs. Which descendant script of Glagolitic, used today in Russia and Bulgaria gets its name from Methodius’s brother?

Cyrillic

7. In 1095, Pope Urban II proclaimed the first of what at the Council of Clermont, encouraging military support for Emperor Alexios I against the Seljuk Turks?

Crusade 

8. Presently impoverished and suffering from desertification, which city 20 km north of the Niger River was the most important trading centre of the Mali Empire under Mansa Musa I and boasted of the world-famous Sankore Madrasah (centre of Islamic learning)?

Timbuktu 

9. If Cossutia (disputed), Cornelia, and Pompeia were the first three, who was the fourth?

Calpurnia (The wives of Julius Caeser)

10. The location of which of the ‘Seven Wonders of the Ancient World’ is disputed? According to legend, they were built by King Nebuchadnezzar I alongside his palace The Marvel of Mankind.

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon 

11. Which Viking leader, after exile from Iceland due to manslaughter around 982, set sail to and founded Greenland’s first Norse settlement? His son, Leif, is generally considered the first European to set foot in North America, preceding Columbus by around 500 years.

Erik the Red 

12. The rule of which Chinese dynasty comprised the Western Period (1045–771 BC), the Spring and Autumn Period (770–476 BC), and the Warring States Period (475–221 BC)? It marked the transition from tribal to feudal society. 

The Zhou dynasty 

13.Upon hearing of which particular mission on his shortwave radio did archaeologist W.E. Wendt name a certain rock shelter in Namibia in 1969, which later yielded seven famous 25,000-year-old stones with animal drawings?

The Apollo 11 Cave 

14. Warka is the phonetically-similar modern name of which Mesopotamian urban centre, which was home to the famous White Temple and its Ziggurat?

Uruk

15. Which he earliest known major Mesoamerican civilisation? Flourishing since around 1500 BCE, it is associated with 17 known statues of colossal heads each weighing 6 to 50 tonnes and with distinctive headgear.

The Olmec

16. 'Conjugal dictatorship’, a term derived from the title of a book by Primitivo Mijares, who mysteriously disappeared after its publication, and whose son was found tortured and killed, was used to describe which couple’s rule over The Philippines from 1965 to 1986?

Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos 

17. Which UNESCO World Heritage Site in present-day Bolivia, was the world’s largest industrial complex in the 16th century? 13,500 Natives performed mita (bonded labour) here to supply silver to Spain.

The city of Potosi 

18. To save their city and its people from King Edward III during the Hundred Years’ War, six members (Burghers) of the council of which French city gave up their lives?  They were later commemorated by a sculpture by Auguste Rodin.

Calais

19. What Japanese word for “A-bomb” is given to the domed portion of the Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotional Hall, the only structure left standing after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima? It was recognised as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996.

Genbaku

20. Also known as La Madrina, the Cocaine Grandmother, and the Black Widow, which drug lord of the Medellín Cartel was said to be responsible for over 2000 murders between the 1980s and 2000s while transporting cocaine from Colombia to Miami and California?

Griselda Blanco 

21. The movement for Italian unity began in 1832 with the organisation of a group called Young Italy by which politician and thinker? He was exiled two years later.

Guiseppe Mazzini 

 22. The remaining two of a group of three churches in Poland are recognised as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Named after a treaty of 1648 which permitted the Lutherans in the Roman Catholic parts of Silesia to build these churches from wood, loam, and straw and without steeples and church bells, what is this group known as?

The Churches of Peace  (in Jawor and Swidnica)

23. The assassination of which Israeli Prime Minister in 1995 spurred his close friend and owner of the NBA team Washington Bullets, Abe Pollin, to change its name to Washington Wizards?

Yitzhak Rabin 

24. Her abduction by the Three Merkits deeply distressed her groom, Temujin, who rescued her after eight months of plundering and pillaging. Who was she?

Borte 

25. The ngatu launima, a highly revered Tongan barkcloth, is associated with two famous queens: Queen Elizabeth II, whose Royal cypher was inscribed on it during her 1953 Tonga visit, and which first Queen regnant of Tonga, under whose coffin it was buried after her death in 1965?

Salote Tupou III 

 

 

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